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BlackBerry lands another legal win over Typo keyboard | CrackBerry.com

Congrats! BlackBerry has now laid to rest what is possibly one of their longest legal battles. Back in 2008, Mformation sued at the time RIM, for violation of remote device management patents held by Mformation Technologies on BlackBerry smartphones asking for $8 for each of the accounted 18.4M BlackBerry smartphones sold for a grand total of $147.2M. Initially, Mformation won. That was overturned and BlackBerry appealed and then they won and as we noted back in August of 2012, Mformation decided once again to appeal the verdict holding it over for many years. That all came to a close on Friday though as Judge Edward M. Chen’s ruling found that “substantial evidence” did not support a judgment of infringement. Done and done.

While BlackBerry has been busy winning the longstanding legal issues with Mformaton, they’ve also been taking care of some more recent ones with pretty good results as well. As noted previously, BlackBerry recently went back to the judge in the BlackBerry Limited vs. Typo Products LLC case to ask judge William Orrick to uphold a preliminary injunction preventing Typo from selling its iPhone keyboard in any form, be it their old version of their ‘re-vamped’ Typo 2 version and this time around they’ve won.

Judge Orrick denied Typo’s motion that the keyboard doesn’t infringe upon any BlackBerry patents, ruling that the introduction of a “new keyboard isn’t grounds for lifting the preliminary injunction.” On top of that, BlackBerry will now also have a chance to prove Typo violated the preliminary injunction and continued sales of the device. “BlackBerry has raised significant questions suggesting that Typo’s sales to foreign retailers after the injunction went into effect…violated the preliminary injunction.”

Now they have more energy to expend on patent creation as opposed to protection.

Blackberry Wins Mformation Technologies Patent Infringement Case

BlackBerry lands another legal win over Typo keyboard | CrackBerry.com.

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